Friday, October 31, 2014

This Weekend: I'll Be Selling Plants at the Micanopy Fall Festival


This is the 40th Annual Micanopy Fall Festival and I'll be joining Dave and Guda from Taylor Gardens Nursery at their plant booth.

We'll have amazing ornamentals, pollinator plants, fruit trees, nitrogen-fixers, rare edibles and other horticultural treasures for your yard and garden.

On Saturday from 9AM - 5PM and on Sunday from 9AM - 4PM, come on down and check out the music, the crafts, the antiques, the food... and of course... the plants!

Look for the Taylor Gardens Nursery booth. I'll be there all day Saturday and probably part of Sunday afternoon after church.

And finally... last but not least...


Happy Reformation Day!

(Heck with pumpkins and ghosts and paganism... I'm more of a nailing-complaints-on-the-church-door sort of guy.)

Have a wonderful weekend and I'll see you in Micanopy.

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Thursday, October 30, 2014

Sale on Stupefying Stories Issue #1

If any of you are interested, this sci-fi/fantasy anthology contains one of my rare short stories, plus some excellent work by other writers:

http://stupefyingstories.blogspot.com/2014/10/its-our-first-ever-36-hour-sale.html

I don't usually write about things other than gardening these days, but the spooky (and highly acclaimed) tale I sold to Stupefying Stories three years ago is quite fitting for this time of year.

Aren't nightmares worth a mere $0.99? ;)

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Today at the 326 Community Market! Goumi berries! Bananas! Weird plants!


Grow your own pineapples!
I had a fun week last week. 

Between the Farmer's Market and Kanapaha, I was able to send a lot of folks home with rare and wonderful edibles for their homes and gardens.

As we near winter it's a great time to plant fruit and nut trees. 

I've also got a few cool rare plants right now, like natal plums, acerola cherries, and a few nitrogen-fixing goumi berries - though we're getting close to running out of this rare berry.

Here's what I have, ordered by price:

HOT PEPPERS: $1.50


CHAYA: $5.00 (limited)

COMMERCIAL FLORIDA PINEAPPLES: $6.00

ACEROLA CHERRIES (small): $6.00

EDIBLE HIBISCUS (various): $6.00 


GOUMI BERRIES (small): $10.00 

KATUK: $6.00

NATAL PLUM (small): $6.00

BANANAS (Dwarf Red and Raja Puri - cold hardy): $8.00

LEMONGRASS (large stem type): $8.00 

DWARF MULBERRIES: $8.00

ILLINOIS EVERBEARING MULBERRIES: $12.00 

WHITE-FRUITED MULBERRIES: $12.00 

GAINESVILLE EPIC FIGS: $12.00

BLUEBERRIES: $15.00

NECTARINES (various): $22.00

PEACHES: $22.00 

JAPANESE PERSIMMONS: $33.00


PECAN TREES: (SOLD OUT!)

CHESTNUTS: (SOLD OUT!)


Visit the 326 Market north of Ocala today and go shopping. There's a lot going on in the nursery and I'm finding more rare edibles each week.

The 326 Community Market runs every Thursday from 3 - 7PM and is really easy to find.


Google map is here. Their Facebook page is here (with lots more photos and info):


Beyond what I carry, there are also folks selling homegrown produce, real old-fashioned lye soap, handcrafts, handmade jewelry, signs, delicious ice cream (from actual hand-milked cows), crafts, vegetables, baked goods, homemade jams and jellies, local raw honey, ornamental plants, homemade birdhouses and more.

The prices are good and my gardening advice is free... come say hi!



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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Hey! I Met Dr. Mom!

Recently I had the privilege of meeting Dr. Mom (AKA The Southern Forager), a fellow wild food hunter and blogger.


Somehow, she and her wonderful husband and children had a little extra time as they were passing through the Sunshine State so we were able to make plans and meet each other in person.

I've been reading her blog for over a year and I encourage you to do the same. Though she's in Tennessee, a lot of the plants she finds and eats can also be found in Florida.

Go - visit her site! You'll be amazed at what can be eaten - and you'll also be amazed by how many things this crazy gal can turn into jam.

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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Easy Gardening Solutions for Lazy Gardeners

The following article was originally published at The Prepper Project.


"Girl in Hammock" (detail). Winslow Homer.
“Girl in Hammock” (detail). Winslow Homer.
Sometimes I wonder: does a person’s garden follow his personality?
Is the love of weeds, praise of borderline chaos and embracing of wild animals simply an outgrowth of a disordered mind?
On the flip side: are perfect beds, straight lines and precisely timed plantings the result of latent OCD?
(I once created a quiz on gardening personality types – you can take the quiz here.)
Ultimately, it’s okay if your gardening reflects your personality.
The main thing to remember as a prepper is this: no matter what style it is, your garden must create value.
Your garden must create value.
If your garden is a sinkhole for resources, you’re doing it wrong and it’s time to make a change.

Are You Too Lazy To Pull Weeds?

Then you need to garden in a way that keeps weeds from becoming a big problem.
Consider going for the Back to Eden method or another deep mulch style of gardening. Weeds WILL consume resources that should be going to your plants, meaning they’ll be eating your potential harvest. If you know they’re your Achilles’ heel… wear boots!
Another way to deal with weeds is via running goats or chickens. If you’ve never been a good gardening but are good with animals, maybe you should simply raise animals instead of a big garden. Let your garden patch become pasture in which you can rotate flocks or herds or both through the weeds – then trade the resulting eggs/meat/milk/cheese for produce.

Are You Too Lazy To Water?

Maybe it’s not a matter of being too lazy. Maybe you’re just really busy so you tend to miss waterings until you notice your tomatoes are dying on the vine.
In that case, your garden needs to be watered in some way other than by hand with the hose.
Consider getting yourself some automated irrigation. Or start gardening onhugelkultur beds.
Another option might be to start gardening in wicking beds, an aquaponics system or just grow aquatic vegetables in a pond.

Are You Too Lazy To Dig Beds Year After Year?

Then the solution is to plant a food forest.
A food forest mimics a natural woodland. You basically take a mixture of edible trees and shrubs, along with nitrogen-fixers and mulch-producing/nutrient-accumulating plants, and create a planned forest. Your digging and hard work is all on the front end when you plant the system. After a few years, the shade of the trees and the falling leaves will take care of the weeds and make the soil in your forest garden spongy, moist and filled with earthworms… who then dig and cultivate without you.
Rather than digging a new cabbage bed every year, you can plant perennial leaf vegetables like chaya, edible hibiscus, basswood, Good King Henry or any number of other things. Rather than digging and weeding a watermelon or strawberry bed, you just plant Japanese persimmons, mulberries, apples or any number of other tasty tree fruit.

Are You Too Lazy To Turn A Compost Pile?

Well, great! So am I.
Stack organic matter anywhere and it will break down. Dig a big trench then fill it with kitchen scraps over time, then plant on top. Pile all your leaves as mulch around the landscaping and it will all eventually break down into compost.
As I posted recently, I stacked compost on a lousy garden bed last year and it fed me with piles of pumpkins… and there are still pumpkins on the way.
You don’t need to turn compost to make it break down. If you’re short on time, let a longer period of composting time work in your favor. Just don’t throw out any potential soil fertility because you’re not able to get out and turn. Find ways to incorporate everything biodegradable and your gardening will get easier from year to year.

Are You Too Lazy To Garden At All?

Maybe it’s not a case of laziness – maybe it’s just that you’re a busy homemaker, police officer, salesman or plumber.
That’s okay. If you’re able to make enough money to feed yourself, perhaps gardening isn’t in the cards for you right now.
In that case, I’d still make sure you know HOW to garden, just in case there’s a point in the future where you NEED to garden.
Even maintaining a small container garden on a back porch can help keep you in practice: but if you can’t even find the time for that, I recommend you take a wild foraging class and make friends with people that DO have the time to garden. I’d also grab good gardening books (not ebooks, unless you print them) and a copy of Survival Gardening Secrets for the future.
You can’t beat the quality of food that a home garden provides – but it’s true; sometimes there’s just no time.
If there is time, however, kick your “laziness” with some of the gardening solutions above.
Now pardon me… I’m going to go lie in my hammock and think about fall crops.

For more gardening and prepping advice, visit www.theprepperproject.com.

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Monday, October 27, 2014

Crash Gardening: Season 2!

Earlier this year I posted a few videos produced by my videographer cousin Jeff.

We rethought the format and the style and are now releasing a new season of Crash Gardening.

10 shows are planned thus far, covering composting, gardening methods, weird root crops and more. The production schedule isn't hammered down yet but we're getting there.

As for video #1: since I get a lot of questions about growing and harvesting cassava, we started with that topic.

Without further ado, here's Crash Gardening Season 2, Episode 1:


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Saturday, October 25, 2014

Sunday Update: I'll be Back at Kanapaha for the afternoon!

Kanapaha Plant Show Pt. II: 9AM - 5PM Sunday
Dave Taylor from Taylor Gardens Nursery and I had a great day today at Kanapaha.

It was great seeing the many of you that decided to stop in and say hi. I love meeting people in person that I've only spoken with via this blog (hey, Ivy Mae!).

Admission to Kanapaha is usually a few dollars per person... but for this weekend, it's free!

There's a lot of cool stuff at this show. Natives, mushroom logs, ornamentals, edibles, herbs, vegetables - there's even a booth selling bird bee and bat houses.

I'll be back Sunday afternoon after my family and I leave our church (which is right down the road.)

As for the show, here's the write-up from Kanapaha:


Fall Plant Sale, Open House, and Orchid Show: October 25 & 26 (9am - 5pm) 2014*

Each October, Kanapaha Botanical Gardens holds an Open House & Fall Plant Sale, inviting visitors to see the facility ADMISSION FREE. Kanapaha Botanical Gardens formally opened to the public in October of 1987 and the Open House is a means of celebrating our 'birthday.' In addition to viewing the botanical gardens, approximately 40 booths will be set up selling a wide variety of plants. The American Orchid Society's judged orchid show will coincide with the Fall Plant Sale and will take place inside Kanapaha's entrance building. Pets are not allowed at these festivals.


The Taylors have a LOT of good nitrogen-fixing and insectary plants at their booth, and we'll also be bringing fruit and nut trees, plus rare perennial edibles to the show.

Come check out our great plants - look for Taylor Gardens Nursery!

Directions to Kanapaha are here.


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Friday, October 24, 2014

Kanapaha Plant Show - This Weekend! 9AM - 5PM, Saturday and Sunday

On Saturday I'll joining Dave Taylor from Taylor Gardens Nursery at their plant booth at the annual Kanapaha Plant Show.

Admission to Kanapaha is ususally a few dollars per person... but for this event, it's free!

I love Kanapaha Gardens - it's unbelievable. You'll see plants there that you've only read about in books.

As for the show, here's the write-up from Kanapaha:


Fall Plant Sale, Open House, and Orchid Show: October 25 & 26 (9am - 5pm) 2014*

Each October, Kanapaha Botanical Gardens holds an Open House & Fall Plant Sale, inviting visitors to see the facility ADMISSION FREE. Kanapaha Botanical Gardens formally opened to the public in October of 1987 and the Open House is a means of celebrating our 'birthday.' In addition to viewing the botanical gardens, approximately 40 booths will be set up selling a wide variety of plants. The American Orchid Society's judged orchid show will coincide with the Fall Plant Sale and will take place inside Kanapaha's entrance building. Pets are not allowed at these festivals.


The Taylors have a LOT of good nitrogen-fixing and insectary plants at their booth, and we'll also be bringing fruit and nut trees, plus rare perennial edibles to the show.

It's worth showing up just to meet Dave. As well as being a white African-American, he's one of the most generous guys I know. He's also hilarious and completely NOT politically correct.

If we don't manage to get kicked out for insulting some soy-eating limp-wristed Gainesvillian... I'd be surprised.

I'll be at church on Sunday so I won't be there in the morning, but I will be there all day on Saturday.

Come check out our great plants - look for Taylor Gardens Nursery!

Directions to Kanapaha are here.

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Thursday, October 23, 2014

Today at the 326 Community Market!


Grow your own pineapples!
This is a great time of year for hitting the Farmer's Market. It's a nice place... there's plenty to see... and I'm there, with plants!

This is also the BEST time of year to plant fruit trees. Forget spring - fall is planting season!

Along with carrying a good collection of perennial vegetables, I've restocked my fruit and nut trees for the fall.

I've also got a few cool rare plants right now, like natal plums, acerola cherries, and a few nitrogen-fixing goumi berries.

Here's what I have, ordered by price:

HOT PEPPERS: $1.50


CELOSIA ARGENTEA: $3.00


CHAYA: $5.00

COMMERCIAL FLORIDA PINEAPPLES: $5.00

ACEROLA CHERRIES (small): $6.00

EDIBLE HIBISCUS (various): $6.00


GOUMI BERRIES (small): $6.00

KATUK: $6.00

NATAL PLUM (small): $6.00

BANANAS (Dwarf Red and Raja Puri): $8.00

LEMONGRASS (large stem type): $8.00

DWARF MULBERRIES: $8.00

WHITE-FRUITED MULBERRIES: $12.00

GAINESVILLE EPIC FIGS: $12.00

BLUEBERRIES: $15.00

PEARS (various)$22.00


NECTARINES (various): $22.00


PEACHES (both gold and white): $22.00

JAPANESE PERSIMMONS (astringent and non-astringent): $33.00


DUNSTAN CHESTNUT TREES: $44.00


PECAN TREES: $44.00



Visit the 326 Market north of Ocala today and go shopping. There's a lot going on in the nursery and I'm finding more rare edibles each week.

The 326 Community Market runs every Thursday from 3 - 7PM and is really easy to find.


Google map is here. Their Facebook page is here (with lots more photos and info):


Beyond what I carry, there are also folks selling homegrown produce, real old-fashioned lye soap, handcrafts, handmade jewelry, signs, delicious ice cream (from actual hand-milked cows), crafts, vegetables, baked goods, homemade jams and jellies, local raw honey, ornamental plants, homemade birdhouses and more.

The prices are good and my gardening advice is free... come say hi!


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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Green papayas: grow! GROW!

It's that time of year where we in frost-prone zones start to get nervous about our papaya trees...


Last year I harvested 87lbs of papaya. Unfortunately, about 70 lbs of that was green papaya.

Though it's popular in Asian cooking and in parts of Latin America - and there are some good recipes out there - I think green papaya is just an alright vegetable... whereas ripe papaya is a marvelous fruit.

Interestingly, there are dwarf types of papaya that will make lots of fruit even though they're shorter than I am. If I could nail some down, I'd grow those. Thus far I've been limited in frost protection because my trees grow to such silly heights.

I think you could dig a 6' deep pit, enrich the bottom with manure or compost, then plant dwarf papaya in there and put plastic over the top for the winter. Local, North Florida papaya could be a hit at the local farmer's market. Unlike our friends further south, we're not plagued by horrible papaya-destroying flies.

I love this fruit but it's been a lot of work to get ripe ones. I must design a better way or I'll be stuck eating green papaya every fall...

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Fall planting time!

I've been prepping and planting my fall gardens for the last couple of weeks.

Do a bit every day... and eventually it all gets done.

Rachel shot a few pictures of my planting transplants one fine fall evening this week:


That's a Plasencia Reserva Organica I'm smoking.

Organic garden... organic cigar.


The seeds that we started in the greenhouse failed on us so I was forced to buy transplants this year. I'll also be doing a lot of direct seeding of mustard, beets, carrots and other goodies.

That garden bed is a pretty sweet mix. It's got dirt from the old chicken run, biochar, half-rotten compost, rabbit manure, peat moss (which I don't like), vermiculite, peanut shells, bones, egg shells, chunks of wood, plus worm castings.

Eclectic!

I'm already looking forward to the cauliflower, broccoli, collards and cabbages we'll be harvesting in a couple of months...

If you're need vegetable planting inspiration for your fall garden, check out the list I posted recently.

So - what are you guys planting?

Monday, October 20, 2014

Snakes are natural pest control

I like these guys:

This black racer was hanging out in a swampy scrubland area
It's truly incredible to me that many folks - even country folk that should know better - will kill the snakes in their yard.

Here's why you shouldn't. If you have ever complained about:

1. Rats
2. Mice
3. Cockroaches
4. Squirrels
5. Berry-eating birds
6. Frogs

...then you should hope you have snakes!

Think about it this way: which do you prefer?

1 snake

or

200 rodents

Snakes are natural pest control!

As a top-end predator, snakes are essential balancing agents in your garden, yard or farm. Rather than killing them, we should deliberately create habitat.

Rock, stick and log piles create good places for these vermin destroyers.

Even stacks of flower pots work well. Look at this beautiful ringneck my daughter and I found while potting up plants a few days ago:


I can hear some of you now: NO! Creating snake habitat is... SCARY! I mean, what about rattlesnakes???

C'mon, don't be a wuss. Seriously.

Click for Amazon page.
Unless you have rattlesnakes around your property, you're probably going to be fine. Their favorite place to live is generally gopher tortoise burrows.

What you want is to leave space for good guys like rat snakes, black racers, garter snakes, ring necks, king snakes, etc. They'll manage your pest control, plus add some slithery beauty to your homestead.

I recommend you get familiar with the good guys.

Heck, pick up a good field guide... maybe you'll start thinking snakes aren't so bad after all.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

The Madness of HOAs

One of my readers contacted me earlier this month.

Apparently, she committed the unforgivable sin of planting perennial peanut in her yard.

Now she's facing an ongoing lawsuit by her Homeowner's Association - check this mess out:

www.SanctuaryAtOakCreek.com

Though I'm not a legal expert by any stretch, this whole lawsuit seems rather silly, particularly since the Florida-Friendly Landscaping law should supersede some of the local neighborhood nonsense.

"In February 2007, we were sent a violation letter from Melrose Management that demanded we remove dead sod in our easement area.  We were under water restrictions at the time and waited until May 2007 to replace the sod withperennial peanut, a Florida-friendly groundcover.  Our HOA documents allow for 90% of our lot to be planted, covered, and maintained in grass or other natural vegetation. The groundcover is/was allowed by our documents; apparently someone on the "board" didn't like it.  The board's selective enforcement continues to this day: they claim certain landscaping changes are "not in keeping with the community aesthetics".  Whose community aesthetics?"

HOAs: Evil... or just horrid?

Good luck, folks.

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Friday, October 17, 2014

From the Inbox: Florida Gardening Failure!


Hi, David-

I haven't been following your blog for long, but I really enjoy it and have found it very encouraging. You grabbed me with the one on two blocks- 17 edibles and I have been a real fan since. I started as a "real food" foodie, but since there is quite a bit of overlap with the prepper/self-sustainable community I have found that I fit into that one as well. 

I am hoping that you can offer some advice. I am in the greater Orlando area. I have put in a backyard garden for the last couple of years that I can't really call successful, but this one was a disaster. I started early, some from seeds others from plants. Got a pretty good crop of bush beans, 3 bell peppers, 8 tomatoes (from 6 plants), no cantaloupes (many blooms, no fruit), no watermelons, no garlic (3rd try), a few microscopic potatoes (see pic below- had more seed potatoes than that), carrots? (See below pic), onions- lots of green tops that never did anything (see pic), and I just dug up the sweet potatoes- none from what must have been 200 ft of vine (see first pic below). I really need some direction here- not sure what I'm doing wrong. Any advice? The goal of self-sufficiency has diminished to just a hope that I could get a few veggies. 

Please help!

D. L.



Pictures:




 

We have a conundrum here.

In a follow-up e-mail from D. L., she wrote:


On a whim I kept track all last year of every edible we purchased- just to see what would be the best things to grow that we clearly like. I'm almost embarrassed that between the two of us we went through 35lbs apples, 50 lbs bananas, 37 lbs grapes, 25 lbs peaches, 8 lbs carrots, 20 lbs onions, 30 lbs of various kinds of potatoes and about 45 tomatoes. It's not quite as bad as it sounds since I am a big canner. 

We had my 8 yr old grandson every Friday during the summer and planted some popcorn (on a whim- in college we had a leaky window and when a roommate spilled the popcorn some started growing in the living room- avocado green shag- carpet) just to see what it looked like along with some green peanuts. The corn got about 3 ft high before it gave up the ghost, but the peanuts still appear viable... I'm demoralized enough without thinking about the that. 

Honestly, I used to have a green thumb.


Any time you move to a new growing region, no matter how good you were in your previous location, you're going to face challenges. When I went from gardening in South Florida to gardening in Tennessee, I was lost for a while. Eventually I hit my stride, however.

(Interesting, the natives used to grow their popcorn on shag carpeting before the white man pulled it all up and put down laminate faux-wood tiles. True story.)

Let's attack the crop problems one at a time. D. L. mentions first that she had a "pretty good crop of bush beans."

That's not surprising. Many bush beans do very well in Florida. Now - if you want to go from "pretty good" to "holy moly" bean yields, put up a big trellis and plant snake beans.

Next crop: bell peppers. She writes that she only got three.

I wouldn't worry about that. You're lucky to get any. I've met people that claim they do great with bell peppers here in Florida; however, my experience with them has been the opposite. They're needy, picky, pain-in-the-neck plants. I wouldn't bother. Hot peppers grow like weeds here (in fact, I've had them pop up in my yard and grow without care). If you can't take the heat, try planting some sweet peppers that aren't bell types and see if they do better. Even John from GrowingYourGreens.com doesn't plant bell peppers anymore.

Tomatoes: 8 from 6 plants? There's another tale that surprises me not. Most larger tomato types fail in Florida unless you plant them at just the right time, under the right conditions, when you see a raccoon howling at a perfect supermoon. They can be grown well - I have a friend that does wonderfully - but I would skip all the big types and just plant cherry varieties. They're much better suited to our climate and rainfall. Yellow pears do well also, but the flavor is bland.

I'm not sure what happened with your cantaloupes and their lack of fruit. Sounds like a bee deficiency. Might be the same problem with the watermelons. I'd try watermelons again, but cantaloupes haven't done the best for us here either.

Garlic is another crop that's not well-suited to Florida. We get some yields but they're poor. Finding varieties is the key: some types are better for the south, others for the north. I would research "garlic for hot climates". Also, fall planting works: spring doesn't.

Potatoes aren't the best root crop for Florida, though you will have luck some year. Russet types have done the best for me but between the heat and the fire ants... well...

Carrots and onions have performed much better for me as fall crops than spring crops. The heat knocks them out quickly. They don't like to set roots.

Finally - sweet potatoes. That's a sad tale. Apparently, if you keep pulling up the vines and throwing them back so they don't root as much along their nodes, they'll concentrate on the main root clump at their center. Also, they may have been too well fertilized. Since all of your root crops have done badly, I'd consider adding bone meal to your garden in the future and seeing if that helps.

Without seeing your soil or how your growing your crops, it's not easy to pinpoint exactly what's going wrong with everything, yet the most obvious failure seems to be in varieties chosen. Raised beds are also not helpful in our fast-draining soils.

Since we're subtropical, not temperate, it's a good idea to look south for vegetables, not north.

You're going to have to get creative in your cooking but it's an adventure!

Here are a few suggestions to replace your failing crops:

ROOTS

Ditch the potatoes and plant cassava, malanga and true yams. They're all tasty and will fill the same niche in your cooking that potatoes fill. They'll also consistently succeed! I'd also try sweet potatoes again. Instead of onions are garlic, think about planting garlic chives and using those for cooking. The flavor is excellent and the plants are perennial.

VEGETABLES

Cherry tomatoes (Everglades cherry tomato is one excellent type), Seminole pumpkin (if you have space), perennial cucumber (Coccinia grandis) if you can find it - ask around at Indian markets if anyone has a plant. In winter: mustard, collards, kale, turnips. Also plant snake beans, edible hibiscus, Surinam purslane and other tropical species.

FRUITS

Florida, for the most part, wants to be forest. Consider adding some tried-and-true trees that will yield happily for you. Mulberries (dwarf, if you can't fit in a big one) are the best berry I've ever grown. Japanese persimmons are rich and delicious. Loquats are a very good fruit for canning and drying. Figs do very well, and Raja Puri bananas should thrive in your area. Pineapples are easy to grow with a little protection.

Good luck.

Finally - does anyone else have some suggestions for D.L.? Leave a comment and let her know.

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Thursday, October 16, 2014

Today at the 326 Community Market! Fruits and Nuts!

Celosia argentea: edible leaves and seeds + beautiful flowers.
We had a great week at the 326 Community Market last week.

Not because I made a lot of money (I didn't), but because I got to hang out with plenty of friends, talk about plants, plus send some trees and plants home with loving gardeners.

My friend Curtiss brought me some nice rooted cuttings as a gift. He's got a Tower Garden system that he uses as a plant-rooting machine. Apparently it works well - the plants he brought looked amazing.

Karen and Valorie stopped by and said hi... Vonnie popped in and picked up a plant... and I bought a nice-looking philodendron from the booth run by my friends at Blacksink Harvest. I also got two quarts of delicious raw honey from Eulee's booth.

Plus, various cute kids stopped in to say hello to my children and point at the blooming Celosia plants (pictured above) we had on our table.

And the weather - perfect!

By the way - this is the BEST time of year to plant fruit trees. Forget spring - fall is planting season!

Along with carrying a good collection of perennial vegetables, I've restocked my fruit and nut trees for the fall.

I've also got a few cool rare plants right now, like natal plums, acerola cherries, and a pair of nitrogen-fixing goumi berries.

Here's what I have, ordered by price:

HOT PEPPERS: $1.50

CELOSIA ARGENTEA: $3.00

CHAYA: $5.00

ACEROLA CHERRIES (small): $6.00

EDIBLE HIBISCUS (various): $6.00

GOUMI BERRIES (small): $6.00

KATUK: $6.00

NATAL PLUM (small): $6.00

BANANAS (Dwarf Red and Raja Puri): $8.00

LEMONGRASS (large stem type): $8.00

DWARF MULBERRIES: $8.00

ILLINOIS EVERBEARING MULBERRIES: $12.00

WHITE-FRUITED MULBERRIES: $12.00

GAINESVILLE EPIC FIGS: $12.00

BLUEBERRIES: $15.00

PEARS (various): $22.00

NECTARINES (various): $22.00

PEACHES (both gold and white): $22.00

JAPANESE PERSIMMONS (astringent and non-astringent): $33.00

DUNSTAN CHESTNUT TREES: $44.00

PECAN TREES: $44.00


Visit the 326 Market north of Ocala today and go shopping. There's a lot going on in the nursery and I'm finding more rare edibles each week.

The 326 Community Market runs every Thursday from 3 - 7PM and is really easy to find.
Google map is here. Their Facebook page is here (with lots more photos and info):


Beyond what I carry, there are also folks selling homegrown produce, real old-fashioned lye soap, handcrafts, handmade jewelry, signs, delicious ice cream (from actual hand-milked cows), crafts, vegetables, baked goods, homemade jams and jellies, local raw honey, ornamental plants, homemade birdhouses and more.

The prices are good and my gardening advice is free... come say hi!

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